Sunshine Meadows – Fall Hiking

The first time I visited a ski resort in summer was when I was about 13 and my Mum, my cousin and I went up to Coronet Peak in Queenstown, NZ for a walk. It was hot and dry and I wore a vest top and a mini skirt. (Hey, it was the 90s!) I remember the main building being open but apart from hiking there wasn’t much more to do apart from enjoy the views over Lake Wakatipu and The Remarkables.The next time was Whistler Blackcomb in 2016. This time the mountain was geared up for the Summer with mountain biking trails, hiking, the Peak to Peak gondola, lots of restaurants and bars and concerts going on all the time. I admit Whistler is a much bigger resort but I think ski resorts these days offer much more in the way of Summer activities.This week Fergus, our flatmate Kurt and I visited Sunshine Meadows. After skiing all season at Sunshine Village, I didn’t want to miss the opportunity to visit the ski area in the off season. It was the beginning of Fall when we visited so there was plenty of snow covering the ground but the trails were mainly snow free and we were able to enjoy the Autumn colours and warmth on the last open day of the hiking season.

Upon arrival, we bought our discounted tickets (due to having a season pass last ski season) for the shuttle bus and Standish chair from guest services. We got on the old yellow school bus along with a swarm of tourists and started up the ski out to the main village.

Travelling up the ski out in a bus made it look a lot steeper than it looks and feels when skiing down it at high speeds after a long day on the slopes. It was also a lot bumpier and at some points I was concerned the old bus would burst a tyre or stop altogether and slide back down the mountain. It was an enjoyable ride despite this and it was great to be up high and look down onto the Black Middle and Lower Canyon runs and of course see the waterfalls and mountain streams, without snow cover.

We hopped on Standish chair which felt a bit odd without skis strapped to our feet but it was great to be heading up the familiar slope again, seeing the ski area to the left of us and the mountain ranges in front of us stretching out as far as the eye could see. It was a tad chilly going up but once at the top the wind died down as we headed out towards the Standish Viewing Deck. This is a large wooden deck situated on the ridge about 400 metres from the top of the Standish chair, the view from the deck is just incredible. You lookout over the whole of Sunshine Meadows, including Rock Isle, Laryx and Grizzly lakes, Simpson River Valley, various mountain ranges and peaks including the impressive Monarch and famous Mount Assiniboine. To the left, the Angel and Divide chairs rise up Lookout mountain with their empty chairs dangling, waiting for the Winter crowds. Its just breathtaking.We quickly started to descend the steep and slippery trail down to Twin Cairns Junction to avoid the crowds, most tourists are not used to walking in snow and we were just as bad, Fergus and Kurt wore Vans, not so good in the snow, I had my North Face Hiking boots on but still managed to slip over onto my knees at one point but that’s just incoordination on my part I think. The view over the Valleys below The Monarch were very autumnal indeed, the oranges and yellows of the Larch trees and the dark green of the evergreens contrasted with the bright white snow covering the ground.We arrived at Rock Isle Junction and carried onto the Grizzly/Laryx Loop trail. En route we passed the beautiful Rock Isle Lake, the most well known and largest Lake at Sunshine Meadows. The lake gets its name from the rocky island in the centre of it where a few trees call home. Behind the Lake, Lookout mountain towered above the meadows and you could clearly see the Divide chair and most of the runs coming off it. They looked much steeper from way down in the valley. Some of the mountain was covered in snow but it was patchy and hard to imaging opening day is only a month and a half away.We carried on down the hill to Grizzly Lake where we were happy to find a few hikers enjoying their lunch. We hadn’t seen anyone for a while and arriving at a lake named after the most feared animal in the Rockies we were a little relieved to see people. Grizzly lake was a different colour than Rock Isle. Rock Isle is bluer and is more out in the open whereas Grizzly is quite sheltered by steep banks and forest. On the far side and head of the lake you could see where the recent forest fires had burnt away the trees in huge areas. The Verdant Creek fire had come very close to the ski resort and during the Summer the lodge was used as a base for the firefighters who were working on fighting the huge fire.Continuing past the lake the trail rose up onto a cliff face and we came upon Simpson Viewpoint. This lookout was probable the highlight of the day for me, the huge Simpson River Valley spreads out before you far into the distance, the different shades of greens in the hills, cliffs and mountains make the valley look even deeper and I was sure I could see all the way to Radium. The most interesting yet sad feature of the valley was the amount of burnt forest there was on both sides of the valley. I’m so glad we had some snow recently so the fires were able to be put out and we were able to visit Sunshine Meadows, it was closed for hiking for a lot of the summer.We walked down the hill to Laryx Lake, the 3rd lake in the Meadows. We were able to walk almost the entire way around Laryx on the stony trail, across narrow log bridges and over the grassy plains. Laryx was quite calm and was sheltered from the wind so we were able to see the reflections of the surrounding mountain peaks in its shallow water which was beautiful. Sat down for a bit and watched a young Chipmunk scurry about looking for dropped food.After a short rest we climbed back up to Rock Isle Lake and at Rock Isle Junction we turned onto the Village to Lake Trail and headed up towards Divide Chair and the runs that come off Stawberry. After stopping at the Rock Isle viewpoint we continued down the path beside the Rock Isle Road green run back to the village. It was nice to actually walk along a ski run we had all been down many times. Being back at the Village when there was no snow was odd, we saw stairs that are usually buried under the snow and paths, roads and signposts that are not normally there, the place looked quite different. Waited for the shuttle bus for around 30 minutes before being informed it had broken down on the way up so we were driven back to the base in a small van. 

It was a great but tiring day and I’m glad I got to experience it before we leave Canada. 

 

 

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Lakes, lakes and Waterfalls

This weekend we took my one of my best mates and former flatmate and his boyfriend, both over from London to some of my favourite places in Banff and Yoho National Parks. 

This post doesn’t contain ellobarate descriptions of the places we went, no detailed accounts of the colours of the lakes or the shadows over the valley from the mountains etc, the pictures speak for themselves in my opinion. 

First we did the 10 minute, short hike to the lookout point overlooking stunning Peyto Lake and the surrounding Waputik Range, Caldron Peak, Peyto Peak and Mount Jimmy Simpson. Photobombed by 2 ladies! Love this photo.Stunning Peyto Lake, amazing colour.One of the best views in the Rockies!

We then headed to the most famous lake in Banff National Park, Lake Louise. Lake Louise is beautiful but it just gets far too busy and I much prefer it in Winter when you can walk across the lake to the Glacier, and it’s far quieter.Lake Louise shorelineLouise Creek

After being turned away from the Moraine Lake turnoff and the overflow parking lot due to it being full we detoured up the Trans Canada to Yoho National Park to visit Takakkaw Falls. It was my first visit to the falls and after a very windey and steep but magnificent drive we arrived at the carpark. It’s a short 10 minute hike to the falls but we decided to scramble up to get a closer look and were awarded with a great view of the 260 metre falls, the creek below and the surrounding peaks.Takakkaw FallsAdam & Gilles Stunning views

Later in the day we finally make it to my favourite lake, Moraine Lake in the Valley of the Ten Peaks. Unfortunately we were too Lake to go Kayaking and have a bite to eat at the cafe but climbed the rock pile to get some lovely views of the lake and valleys around it. Not many places compare to this.Adam & IAdam & GillesLooking down the valley towards the highway

Overall it was of my favourite days out sightseeing. I just love taking friends to see these amazing local spots and seeing new places for myself. There is still so much to see here in the Rockies. I cannot wait!

Favourite Roadtrip Memories

Looking for dinosaurs in the Badlands, AB  Kayaking in Caliper Lake Provincial ParkMining for Amethyst in Thunder Bay, ONThe amazing sunsets in Sleeping Giant NPExploring Beautiful MontrealSwimming and Sunbathing in Shediac, NBLighthouse trail on Gaspiesie PeninsulaExploring the Maritimes in Nova ScotiaDriving the Cabot Trail on Cape Breton IsExploring Grassy Point in North SydneySeeint Whales and exploring St John’s, NFTracing heritage and hiking on Fogo IslandExploring Gros Morne National Park Ancient Pictographs in Lake Superior.Passing the centre of CanadaThe beautiful Prairies of SK & Manitoba

Moose Jaw – Banff

The very last day of our 2 month long trip wasn’t the most interesting. 90% of the journey was long, straight, flat roads along the prairies. Silos, hay bales, farmers tending to their crops on huge machines, oil drilling sites, small isolated towns, electricity pylons, and the train track were the only sights to see. I think the land has its own beauty though, the colour of the grass and wheat, the patterns and stripes and the contrast of the blue sky is beautiful. There is so much of it. The sky is amazing our here, it reminds me of the song ‘Little Fluffy Clouds‘ by Orb. Have a listen or download it if you are crossing soon. The huge expanse of blue makes you feel really small, it was a cloudless day when we drove through but I can imaging watching a storm brewing out here would be epic.When we finally approached Calgary we felt relieved, the outline of the city skyscrapers in the distance with the Rockies towering up behind it was a welcome sight, not only did it mean the long flats were ending but I meant were were nearly home. We were both tired.we stopped at Walmart do do some grocery shopping and headed West. The weather had taken a turn upon entering Calgary and the Rockies and a bit of rain fell but it was mostly just overcast. We wondered if we would see or smell any of the smoke from the nearby forest fires that had been burning since just after we left. Arrived in a very busy Banff and it immediately felt like we had never left, it was hustle and bustle and full of tourists (it’s a bank holiday weekend so this was to be expected) and it must have taken us close to an hour to get some beers, get our rent from the bank and drop it off at our landlord, Mercy’s place in Otter street and get over the bridge to Lougheed Circle. On arrival we were greeted by our wonderful flatmates who we had missed dearly. They had been preparing a lovely dinner of Meatballs, Pasta sauce, pasta, salad and bread for us as a welcome home dinner, it was just delicious, and great to all sit around the dinner table and catch up.Unpacked the car into our new room which is huge! We have a walk through wardrobe which is twice the size of our old wardrobe and a big ensuite bathroom. We love it! 

Had some drinks, chatted, laughed and watched Wonder Woman. It’s great to be back. 

Ottawa – Sault Ste Marie

Tonight we saw Moose! Moose! We saw 2 Moose in fact, 2 Moose with big antlers like you see in the photos! Amazing!

As you know in previous posts I have, until now, thought Moose were a myth, like the Moa in NZ or the Jump Bear in Australia, they are a made up beasts to scare tourists. (I didn’t really think this but was wondering why the hell we hadn’t seen one yet) Especially in Newfoundland, a small island with some 250,000 Moose, people were saying ‘oh you’ll surely see a Moose up there’, well no, we didn’t. 

We did however see 2 Moose about 5 minutes out of Sault Ste Marie, on the side of the motorway. One was awkwardly walking down the verge towards the road and the other standing proudly atop it looking out into the distance. It would have made a great photo but we were past them in such a flash. They were big but not as big as some of the road signs suggest, I don’t doubt that they do get huge, big enough to total a car in fact but these 2 were probably young males, they could have done plenty of damage had we hit them though! They were beautiful,  dark brown with impressive furry antlers. We were very lucky the weather had cleared as most of the journey had been heavy rain, that is a recipe for disaster! 

As we came across the animals, a big 1500L Ute was passing us so we couldn’t even change lanes to try to avoid them. Luckily Fergus was quick thinking and slowed down as he saw them then sped up as we passed so they would have plenty of time to get onto the road if in fact that’s where they wanted to go. Apparently they are a bit silly and just wander about anywhere. You just have to be so careful.We saw in our rear view mirrors that they had made it onto the road so the traffic had to stop. What a shame we were not a little slower, I could have had a great shot of them, instead I have a pic off the net, it’s kind of what happened.I’m so glad we can now add Moose to the list of animals we have seen. For me, Grizzly Bears and Orcas are the ones I most want to see. Where are the Orcas?

That evening we went to Boston Pizza for a late dinner before staying at another very busy Walmart car park. Yaaay Moose!

North Sydney – Edmundston – Ottawa

The trip across Nova Scotia and New Brunswick wasn’t too interesting, we are pretty much gunning it over to Lake Superior to do some kayaking and hiking. 

I did however get a very unexpected gift in my back account a couple of days after getting back to Canada. I checked my account to see how much I didn’t have and to my surprise it had shot up quite a lot due to a ‘credit memo’. After Googling that I was none the wiser and planned to visit a branch the following day to tell them how evil they were for mistakenly putting money in my bank at a time I needed it most. Maybe they might let me keep it? Hardly. It turns out my wonderful Mother and Stepfather had given me some cash as a gift. Mum said it’s for all the Christmas and Birthday presents I haven’t received in the 17 or so years I’ve been away from NZ. I’ll take that, thank you kindly. That wil pay for the remainder of this trip, my season’s ski pass and my first month’s rent. So very handy. Love you guys xoxoIn Edmundston we stayed in the Walmart and my was it busy! There must have been 20 campers three that night. I always feel a lot safer knowing there are plenty of fellow campers in the parking lot. Met a nice lady from BC, late 50s perhaps, in the washrooms the following morning who was a 1st time Walmart camper and as a veteran I was able to give her the ‘lowdown’, I basically told her we have done it a few times and haven’t had any issues. It’s a great way to travel. The drive through Quebec was long and boring, we bypassed Quebec City but went through Montreal which made things a lot slower. Quebecwans are bad drivers, much like France and Italy (probably most of Europe) they are a bit reckless and impatient, and indicating? Hell no! Drove across long plains of wheat fields with the occasional silo or factory of some sort, a Fromagerie here and there and glimpses of the Ottawa River.In Ottawa we stayed in an Air B&B, we needed to do a load of washing and have a proper shower so we stayed with Helen in Kanata. Had dinner in a local pub, The Brew Table, I had the liquria Chicken salad, it was great! The stay was pleasant and we got breakfast in the morning. The bed wasn’t as comfortable as our car bed is though. Our Woods Mattress is the best!

Day 5 – Deer Lake to Port aux Basques

I made breakfast again and served it to Fergus in bed, again. Lucky boy! It was a cold morning but the clouds were clearing and I had been told it was going to be a nice day by the campsite lady. We entered Gros Morne National Park around 10am and it was quite a stunning drive in. The road twisted and turned up and down through heavily forested high valleys and beside dark blue lakes and small coastal townships before turning onto the West coast and heading North where it was flat until the landscape dramatically turned to high sided glacial tablelands.   

Our first stop was Western Brook Pond which is a huge fiord like formation with a lake at the base. It’s basically a fiord that doesn’t make it out to sea. The cliffs above the lake are taller that the CN tower in Toronto in parts and it’s a magnificent sight from the motorway. You walk 45 minutes from the car park through forested paths and boardwalks over boggy ponds to get to the boatlaunch and cafe beside the lake. There is a boat cruise but it was $60 each, unfortunately too expensive for us this time. We had a look around the souvineer shop and cafe and surrounding area before walking back to the car. I was a bit dissappoimted with Western Brook Pond really, when you Google the images of it you are met with people overlooking the lake from up high not photos of the boatlaunch which is on the opposite end of the fiord! I assumed this would be the place we would see but that is a 8 hour long hike from another part of the park. Gutted!Carried on up the coast to Shallow Bay which my Lonely Planet described as ‘seems out of place as if transported from the Carribean’, but annoyingly both the roads leading to the bay were on the map but didn’t actually exist….bugger.

We turned around, headed South again and stopped briefly at the wreck of the S.S Ethie a ship that ran ashore in 1919. There isn’t much you can see above the water but it’s a good photo spot and a nice pebbly beach. Drove around Lobster Cove where we visited a lighthouse briefly and looked for a lookout in Norris Point, another recommendation from the Lonely Planet we were unable to find. It was lovely seeing all the small bays as we headed inland and joined the motorway again via the blue waters of the East Arm and Lomond. Passed the ski hill again and followed the setting sun all the way to Port aux basques. Still didn’t see any Moose. There are no Moose in Canada, I’m sure of it! Had some dinner before lining up to get on the overnight Ferry. It was a quick boarding compared to our trip over to Newfoundland and by 10:30pm we were relaxed in front of the big TVs on board watching The Discouvery Channel. 

Day 4 – Fogo to Deer Lake

Woke up to a very dreary, rainy and windy morning, a total contrast to the day before which I was slightly relieved of as I had gotten a little sunburnt on our afternoon hike. Sorry Mum! 

I made breakfast on the stage to get away from the howling wind and to let Fergus sleep for a while longer before taking him his breakfast of egg, sausage & mushroom roll in bed. Stopped by the big church in Fogo (there were about 4 churches in town) to see the plaque high on the back wall dedicated to the Slade family. There was also a Slade tombstone in the nearby cemetary. One thing I did notice about the Island is the amount of churches and cemeteries. It seems there is a church for every denomination plus a cemetary! I’ve never seen so many in one small area of land!Visited the F.U Trading Co Museum in Seldom-Gone-By and went on a short tour run by a local teenager who worked there. A lady from London, ON we had chatted to earlier that morning at the campsite was also there. Her blankets had gotten wet due to the storm the previous night so she was using the dryer at the museum. They had a laundromat on site, odd I know! She joined our tour but kept asking loads of questions about why the Island’s fisheries were in decline and what could be done to make it thrive again. Learnt a bit of history about the shop before going onto the shop floor and managers office. Went for a coffee and a nosey around the ‘Museum of the Flat Earth‘, an interesting place with a weird and wonderful collection of Flat Earth bits and bobs including old photographs of the island’s Flat Earth society members and their membership certificates. 
Went for a takeaway lunch of Chicken Nuggets and chips at Vanessa’s Take out & convenience and headed down to the 2:00 ferry back to Newfoundland. Another very quick trip on a calm sea, thankfully the wind from earlier had disappeared. 

Headed back down the peninsula on the 331 which was full of potholes and made for a very bumpy and nervous trip. Passed coves, bays and small coastal towns containing multicoloured wooden houses, craft shops and roadside veggie stalls during which time the rain fell and large trucks passing sprayed a barrage of water onto our windscreen. 

Once back on the Trans Canada the potholes receded and we were able to make some leeway. Passed a big concert in progress in Grand Falls-Windsor and more roadworks dotted about the place.

Arrived in Deer Lake just outside of Gros Morne National Park and due to not having any accomodation booked we went to Tim Hortons to use the wifi, also had a cheeky burger. Fergus found a campground on the lake for $25 so we booked in there. 

On arrival at our lakeside site I wasn’t too happy, the internet was only available near the office and we were at least 15 minutes walk from there so no internet. Also, the one and only washroom/shower block was a 5 minute walk away. It doesn’t sound a lot but if you frequently go in the middle of the night like me you don’t want to be walking for 5 minutes in the cold, wet, pitch black night! 

Fogo Island – isolation at it’s best

We left St John’s and after topping up on supplies (food, petrol & water) we headed West towards the hilariously named coastal town of ‘Dildo’. Stopped briefly for a look around the town but there was nothing much there unfortunately, took some photos of the town sign before carrying on. Passed through Terra Nova NP where we had to wait repeatedly at roadworks which increased our journey by over an hour frustratingly, I was keeping my eye out for Moose the whole journey but they still managed to avoid my gaze. Listened to The Dreadnaughts, Cat Stevens, Billy Joel and Frank Turner, a bit of an eclectic mix of feelgood songs. Arrived at the small ferry terminal in Farewell around 5:20 and joined the queues of cars, RV’s and lorries waiting to board. The ferry left just after 6pm and after a look around the 3 decks we shared some chips, attempted a crossword and before we knew it we had arrived in Stag Harbour. Only an hours trip and relatively calm too.Drove 25 minutes to Fogo on the North Side of the Island and found the Brimstone Head RV park and after paying the very nice man $15 we settled in for the night. 

The RV park is located at Banks Cove, the impressive Brimstone Head towers above the cove on one side and on the other side is a smaller headland separating the cove from the next bay. There are showers, toilets, a stage, various snack bars (closed during our stay), a playground and the local Lions club at the top of the park. There is a festival held in the Park in mid August so I’d image all the extra amenities are here for that. It’s a beautiful spot.We watched an amazing sunset on the beach before having some dinner. It was great to be back cooking on our camping stove, I really enjoy it for some reason, I think it takes me back to my childhood and Mum cooking on her wee stove while tramping. Great memories. 

Day 2

Made scrambled egg and frankfurter rolls for breakfast before hiking up Brimstone Heads. The trail starts at the RV park and heads up into a grassy, boggy plain via a series boardwalks before you hit the steep stairs leading up the cliff. The views as you climb the headland are stunning and you can see bays, islands and sea for miles.Once up the stairs you walk over the moss covered rocks out to the very top of the headland where there is a large wooden viewing platform. Brimstone Heads is believed to be one of the corners of the world by the Flat Earth Society and when standing up there, looking out to the vast expanse of Iceberg Alley in the North Atlantic Ocean, I can see where they are coming from. We met some people from Southern Newfoundland up there and had a chat and took photos. Everyone we have met has been so friendly. The man who runs the RV park who’s wife may be a distant relative of Fergus, The French/Canadian man travelling around Newfoundland in his car with all the stickers who we also met on the Ferry back to NF, the lady from London, ON and her 2 dogs, who we met again at the Museaum who also reminds me of Lyn Cameron. They all asked about our accents and our trip and were happy to give us any travel advice and knowledge they had gained.

We then went to visit Bleak House Museam which is one of the original homes on the Island. It was built for the Slade family who ran a shipping company in the area. The Slades are distant relatives of Fergus’s. We had a guided tour of the house from a local lad with a strange accent. I also asked him a lot of questions about the Island and growing up on it. From what I gather most people graduate high school, go away to university and never return. Quite sad. We wandered through the old house following the tour guide while he told us about the rooms and their contents, much of which was original. He was clearly reading from a memorised script, if we asked about anything outside of what was on the tour he was unsure, he was only about 20 I’d say but he did a good job.

We headed over to Tilting for a look around then on to Joe Batts Arm, another of the Island’s larger villages on the North side. It’s named after a crew member of Captain Cook and is now famous for its very modern and very expensive Inn. Not my cup of tea as it sticks out like a sore thumb but it has provided the town with lots of jobs so the locals are happy. 

On the entrance to the Joe Batts Point Trail we met a lovely local lady who came out to get her little fluffy white dog that had run out to greet us. We spoke for quite a while about life on the island and our travels before heading off on the stony path towards the point. The trail meanders along the coast past vege patches, ponds, geological dig sites, little bays, streams and at one point a huge black box of an artists residence. These are common on the island and have been popular for tourists and artists alike. We saw 3 on our travels around. They are all modern, boxy and all accessed by walking trail. 

We passed a little green hut and over the next ridge we found the trail end and the large, green, iron bird sculpture that marks the end. Lay on the large flat rocks below the sculpture and had a rest. It was a very muggy day and we were both wearing jeans so had sweated a lot and we were hungry. The return journey didn’t feel as long and we were lucky to see the local heard of Caribou grazing. They were smaller that I thought they would be, a lot smaller that Elk but they may have been young males. They didn’t seem too bothered by us and it was nice to add another animal to our list, we hadn’t seen any Caribou as they don’t live in Banff NP.Returned to the camp for dinner of noodles, fried spam, mushrooms, boiled egg and spring onions. Watched another stunning sunset before retiring to bed to watch a movie. 

Return journey – Day 1 – London to St John’s

The month in London flew by. At times it didn’t but when we arrived back at Gatwick  Airport after saying goodbye to Fergus’s Mum Alison at Croyden train station it seemed as if it were only yesterday we arrived. I guess any trip home seems short when you have been away so long. 

After the obligatory breakfast of Eggs Benedict at the Wetherspoons and a bit of shopping in the North Terminal we boarded our Westjet flight an hour and a half late.The flight was fine except for a 10 minute bout of what the stewardess described as ‘moderate turbulence’. During this time I was on the verge of tears/heart attack and gripping the seat as if my life depended on it, I even yelped aloud at one point, everyone around me wasn’t bothered in the slightest.  Pussy….

We landed in St John’s just after 1pm, luckily we had no trouble at immigration and got a cab straight to Ben & Philippa’s. A key was left in the letterbox for us but Ockre (their dog) barked and growled every time we tried to openthe door, afraid of getting eaten alive on our very first day back in Canada we dumped our bags at the back door and headed into town for some lunch. Double pussy….Found a street full of bars in town and went to a pub called Green Sleeves, had a couple of pints and a burger each. They were lovely burgers but the bill came to $80! For a pub lunch! We had forgotten how expensive Canada was so were a little shocked, in London you could get the same for £15 in Wetherspoons. 

Wandered down to Eastern Edge Gallery where Philippa is the Director and got a ride home with her. Freshened up and repacked our bags and enjoyed an afternoon beer on their patio.  

Walked up and down the steep roads into town and went to The Gypsy Tea Room and had a bite to eat. Set in a large, open courtyard, this restaurant is just so cute, with its white buildings, trees, outdoor bar and lights I felt like I was back in South Africa enjoying wine in a Franschhoek Winery. Fergus and I shared Chicken Wings and fries and had a glass of Chardonnay. Chatted about Weddings, babies, house prices, life in Canada compared to London, our trip and lots of other stuff. They are such a lovely couple and it was great to spend more time with them. If we  do manage to get PR and stay in Canada I’d love to come and visit again. St John’s is a beautiful place. Went for a drink at The Black Sheep where it was Jazz jam night, saw some really talented musicians, especially Philippa’s friend who played the Banjo and sang. St John’s has a healthy music scene and a lot of people follow local bands which is really great. The music scene is so important in any town and I’ve always been a big supporter of local bands as my father was a misition for over 40 years. Big thanks to Ben and Philippa. Even though they are so far away it’s comforting knowing you have good friends from the UK living in the same country. They have been so good to us and we thoroughly enjoyed our 2 very short trips to St John’s. I hope we can return someday.