Revelstoke 2018 – Part 2

Day 2

Suffice to say, we were all a bit tired the next morning and barely made it to breakfast which was in the lobby and consisted of cereals, toast, bagels and muffins as well as waffles and tea and coffee. It was ok, I really needed a full English though!

Once at the ski hill which is only a few kilometres out of town we parked and went to get our ski passes. Zeke, the lucky bugger was given a free one by a passer by who was heading home for some reason! The rest of us got ours for $50 each and we headed up on the Revelation Gondola. The gondola is in 2 sections so on the way up we had to all get out and then jump into a second gondola to get to the Mackenzie Outpost which is just over halfway up the mountain.  We got out and headed down a cat track to the Stoke chair which would take up to the top.  Getting out in the fresh air really made me feel better. It was a lot hotter that the mountains we normally ski and by the end of the day my bag was filled with discarded clothes including my own t-shirt and neck warmer, the first time this season I haven’t worn it. I’d say it was around 6-8 degrees up top.Tate (who had been to the hill before) wanted to head to the Ripper chair so we traversed across and headed down Vertigo, a black run down the ridge of the mountain between the front side and the North Bowl. I followed Tate down and around a steep cliff and the others headed down a tree run full of moguls. My legs were a bit sore after that and we ended up heading back to the front side and missing out on accessing the North Bowl altogether the first day.

The runs from the top were long, long, wide tree line groomers which were really nice to ski. We did Jalapeno, Pitch Black and Critical Path to name a few.

The views were just amazing and there was not a cloud in the sky so we could see all the way down the Valley, over to the town of Revelstoke as well as the Columbia River and the mountain range above it.Stopped for a drink and a bite to eat at Revelation Lodge. I was feeling really tired and ill. Skiing with a hangover is fine when you are out in the fresh air skiing, being inside in the stuffy Lodge was hard.

Did a few more runs and decided to call it a day.

Loaded up the car and headed back to our motel.

Showered and rested then headed into town to a Chinese buffet at Hong Kong Restaurant. Zeke had found the place and we were all keen as mustard, who doesn’t like a Chinese buffet?

The food was rather good, the place wasn’t too busy apart from a few old locals and there was heaps to choose from including cakes and help-yourself ice cream. Yum!

With full stomached we went back to the motel and jumped into bed.

Day 3

Headed up the mountain again after packing up the car and checking out of the Gateway Inn.

We were all feeling ready for a big day (despite not actually getting up the hill till near on midday.

The weather was bang on again and the temperature was warm. Headed right up the top again and over to The Ripper Chair. The Ripper is at the back of the mountain and has long groomers, long mogul runs and loads of tree runs.

We did a few runs down the groomers with the boys taking every opportunity to find jumps.

Met a couple of guys Kurt worked with in Banff who knew the mountain well and headed to the lodge for lunch and beers with them.After heading back up they took Tate and I down the North Bowl. We did ‘Meet The Neighbours’ which was quite steep and powdery but it was great to get away from groomers and do some more technical skiing. My legs were jelly after doing that though. Did a couple more frontside runs before leaving them and the four of us heading down the mountain and back to the car.

Stopped off at A&W for burgers and headed home. The drive through the mountains was really spectacular again and we saw a lot more of the mountains now the weather was clear.An amazing road trip with top people once again.

Advertisements

Revelstoke 2018 – Part 1

Our annual ski trip away was a bit smaller this year and despite inviting all 9 people in the house only Kurt, Zeke, Tate, Fergus and myself were able to go.

This year we chose Revelstoke Mountain Resort which is located on Mount Mackenzie, just outside the town of Revelstoke in British Columbia. We chose to go there not only because its an amazing mountain but also because with our Big 3 passes we get a whopping 50% off lift passes!

Revelstoke impressively, has the longest vertical drop of any ski hill in North America and at 5620ft, you really notice this when skiing all the way from the very top to the base. It`s just huge! The mountain has 3 lifts, The Revelation Gondola, The Stoke chair and The Ripper chair and has 1214 hectares of skiable terrain.Our trip started on a sunny Friday around noon and after packing the car up with gear and attaching skis and boards on the roof (and after quick stops for fuel and Tim Hortons) we were off!We drove North up the Trans Canada highway and turned West just after Lake Louise township to enter British Columbia and Yoho National Park. The road between Lake Louise and Golden is beautiful but in Winter it`s constantly closing for avalanches and its quite scary in places, especially the final 10km into Golden. It begins with a flat section with Mt Ogden on your right and Pope`s Peak to your left.  As you drive into BC and past The Great Divide Lodge and over The Kicking Horse Pass the motorway swoops down into the valley quite steeply. The amazing spiral tunnels are on your left as well as the turnoffs to Takkakaw Falls, the small town of Field, Emerald Lake and the Natural Bridge.

We stopped at Natural Bridge last year on our way to Panorama during the Winter. The boys all walked around the frozen river and into the cave but Fergus and I didn’t as we thought it looked a bit dodgy and I wasn`t keen to slip into ice-cold water. This year however, the river had frozen much more so Zeke, Tate and I clambered down the snowy slope and walked over the middle of the river to the cave. Inside a couple of guys were taking photos of the incredible frozen waterfall and the odd shaped rocks the current had carved out. It was just amazing to see, especially as we had last been there at the end of Summer and the water really gushes through there fast. Its hard to imaging that it gets cold enough for it to completely freeze.We carried on down the Kicking Horse River Valley, the trainline moving parallel to the road almost all the way and headed North West to the Kicking Horse Canyon. This part of the road is scary and is the part that closes for avalanches during the Winter. The Kicking Horse Canyon project says `The engineering and construction challenges in the Kicking Horse Canyon are immense. The area is subject to many rockslides, debris torrents and avalanches’ That says it all really. On the left is a `huge drop down to the river below and on the right, more frightening to me is cliffs and rocky outcrops rising metres and metres above you. These are covered in snow and loose rocks that fall all throughout the year. They are held back by huge areas of concrete barriers and metal fences. All quite foreboding as we drove down the windy road. Once out of the canyon we saw the industrial town of Golden sprawled out below and the cloud covered Kicking Horse Mountain rising above the town. From Golden we headed North towards Donald then turned West towards Glacier National Park. This part of the drive, Rodgers Pass through the Selkirk Mountains in particular, was absolutely breathtaking. The road follows the river South then turns West and flows in between Mt MacDonald and The Camels before heading South again past the Rogers Pass National Historical site. (this as well as the other short hikes were wanting to do along the road were all closed for the Winter) This stretch of road was at the base of some huge mountains that towered up into the clouds, there were multiple snow sheds along the road to prevent vehicles getting caught up in avalanches which clearly had been roaring down the mountains before we drove through as most of the snow sheds were covered in tonnes of snow, one had at least 3-4 metres of snow on the top of it. Insane! To keep the highway and railway open during the winter, the Royal Canadian Artillery uses 105 mm howitzers (cannons) to knock down the avalanches under controlled circumstances so traffic is not caught unexpectedly. It was pretty cool singing along to CCR and other old music while travelling through this beautiful area.Drove around the side of Mount Revelstoke National Park and into the town of Revelstoke. I checked us in at out accommodation, The Gateway Inn and we unpacked the car. The room consisted of 3 double beds, all along one wall facing the TV, a large bathroom, fridge, coffee making facilities and a nice big window with a mountain view. It wasn’t luxury but it was comfortable.After we relaxed for a bit and had a couple of beers in the room w headed into town for dinner. It was about 20 minutes into town on foot and I couldn’t believe the height of the snowbanks we passed. Outside every house and business were piles of snow almost taller that me. Even the build up on the lawns was nearly shoulder height in places. Revelstoke makes Banff look like it only has a dusting. I don’t know how the town copes with all the snow, it was definitely an eye-opener!Town was very quiet for a Friday night, but we soon found out where everyone was! I had been told about a place called The Village Idiot by some guys who had stayed at my hotel a few weeks ago and they said we had to go there. When we opened the front door, the place was packed! And I mean packed, the tables all full, bar seating full and more people waiting.

We popped over to a nearby Irish bar, The Last Drop for a few beers and some pool before heading back about an hour later.

Had to wait at the bar for a table but as soon as we ordered our drinks a booth in the back became free.

The Village Idiot is your typical rowdy ski bar. The walls and furniture are decorated with old skis and snowboards, there is sports memorabilia on the ceiling and walls (we aptly sat in amongst Calgary Flames stuff), big windows, brightly coloured walls and wooden tables and chairs and a happy buzz about the place.The menu is also very good with lots of quirky named yummy dishes. We started with a plate of Philly Cheesesteak Spring Rolls to share which were lovely and made us all more excited to see what our mains would be like. I ordered the HOW TO LOSE A CHICK IN TEN BITES GARLIC PESTO CHICKEN CLUB. This masterpiece starts with a grilled chicken breast sandwiched between two pieces of garlic ciabatta toast, with its dear friends bacon, lettuce, tomato, onion, and, of course, cheddar cheese. Finished with a hefty smear of our pesto garlic aioli. Wipe your chin, you’re drooling at a fancy meal! It was nice and filling after all the beer we had already consumed.

The boys all got the BRILLIANT BURGER – The chef’s love affair with burgers is complete. This homemade patty is topped with a generous chunk of back bacon, smoked corn, cheddar cheese, garlic aioli and our very own special sauce. They all raved about it, especially Tate who claimed it was one of the best burgers he has ever eaten! I’d recommend The Village Idiot to anyone, what a fun place!

Next, we moved on to The River City Pub, which had a band playing according to our waitress at The Village Idiot. It was a big, English style pub and reminded me of a Wetherspoons but with music. Double Gin & Tonics were on special, so we had a few rounds and chatted before moving to another table once the band set up and the dancefloor was cleared.  Tate started the dancing off for the night and eventually Fergus and I joined in. I was rubbish as always but the band were quite good, a mix of country and rock, very Canadian.When the band was close to finishing we headed back to the Inn in a cab. Things got a little out of hand at that stage, tiredness, drunkenness and 4 lads which resulted in a bit of a scuffle. By about 3am we were all tucked up safely in bed. Overall it was a pretty fun night of good food, pool, beers, dancing and laughs.

Hiking Old Quarry Loop

Last Monday was a wonderful day, bright blue sky and lots of powdery snow following almost 2 whole days of solid snowfall. Too nice to sit indoors.

Layla and I decided to hike the Spray River Loop before I had to go to work at 3pm so after a Latte at home we headed off to the Banff Springs Golf Course where the Spray River East Trail starts.Spray LoopDue to a good 30cm of snow cover we were unable to locate the Spray River East Trailhead which I can see from the maps is just beyond the bridge behind the hotel, so we continued walking up the Golf Course road for about 200m and found the Mount Rundle Trailhead, this eventually joins the Spray River East Trail after a short walk around the fairway and up a steep incline around the side of Mount Rundle.1Once on the trail we saw the indentations of where the cross-country ski tracks are (the trail was groomed the day before but a further 10cm had fallen since then so the tracks were covered) so we stuck to the middle of the trail so as not to disturb them. Layla led the way in her trusty snow boots, I followed in my hiking boots.

 The trail is mostly long, flat straights through the forest but you and venture off at points to see the view across the river. The view doesn’t disappoint either! From where we were we could see the semi frozen Spray River heading North towards the Bow River below us, The Rimrock Hotel nested halfway up Sulphur mountain and the Banff Gondola rising above it to the summit facility and above that the bright blue cloudless sky. It is one of the best views I’ve seen in Banff and one of the least seen by the masses I assume.2During our hike we only saw a handful of cross country skiers, no other walkers or anyone fat biking and luckily no animals. When on these trails and its all quiet and peaceful you do wonder who or what may be looking at you. A woman and her dogs were chased down this very trail at the end of last Winter by Bear 148. (who has unfortunately since been shot by a hunter in BC) There are also Wolves and probably Cougars in this area as well, but we didn’t see or hear anything but the river meandering through the valley and the whoosh of the snow falling from the trees.3At about 12:30pm we came across a man cross country skiing and asked how far the bridge was and his reply was ‘about 4-5 km’ so we decided to turn around and take the Old Quarry Trail as we didn’t have time to do the whole Spray river Loop in just a couple of hours. So, we turned around and headed off on another trail down the ridge towards the river. This trail was steep and narrow, but we had magnificent views of the valley with the Banff Springs hotel and Mount Norquay in the distance. We passed a woman snowshoeing as we came down and wondered if we should have hired them as well. Headed over the bridge and up a steep incline to the Spray River West Trail.4As it turns out, the area beyond where we had cut onto the trail is for skiing only, so we wouldn’t have been able to hike the whole loop anyway.  The trail on the West side of the river winded through the trees and was flatter that the East. We passed 2 children and their Father skiing and chuckled as the little girl fell into the soft powder and then stared at us as we passed.5The trail ended at a car park just beyond the hotel and after walking back to my house we enjoyed another coffee and Maple Cookies. Yum!

Grotto Canyon FAM Tour

Layla and I were lucky enough to get to do another FAM tour with Discover Banff Tours in mid December. This time it was Grotto Canyon.

Grotto Canyon is located just outside Canmore in Exshaw, an area made up of a number of plants and a small hamlet. 1The group was made up of around 25 of us and 2 guides, one of which also took us on the snowshoe tour of the Paint Pots.

We put on our snow cleats and walked through a stunted pine forest before coming to a viewpoint at the edge of the forest overlooking The Bow Valley. 23On entering the canyon the path changed from packed snow to ice and in places the ice wasn’t very thick. People’s feet were disappearing through the ice all over the place but thankfully the creek we were walking on was only 10cm or so deep.

Once deeper inside the canyon and more sheltered from the sun the creek became hard with layers of ice and footing was much stabler.  The canyon walls slowly became higher as we progressed and soon the walls rose high above us and trees clung onto the sides, the snow hanging off their branches.56At one point we were shown ancient pictographs on the canyon walls which were likely created by Hopi visitors from the Arizona region. The ochre used to paint the designs was most likely collected from the Paint Pots.811We stopped for lunch in a lovely area containing frozen waterfalls people were climbing. We ate Maple cookies, had hot Chocolates and watched the folks climbing, the squirrels foraging for food and took lots of photos. What a lovely spot for a break.10791213After our break we headed back through the canyon just as the sun came out and lit up the ice and the snow covered sides. It was just beautiful.1314

More info:

Who: DiscoverBanff Tours

Where: Grotto Canyon, Banff National Park

What: Hotel Pick up & Drop off, Ice cleats & hiking poles, refreshments

Difficulty: 4.2km, 100m elevation gain

Duration: 4 hours

Price: $74 Adult / $42 Child

 

 

 

Johnston Canyon Evening Icewalk

Again, we were lucky enough to receive another FAM tour with Discover Banff Tours this week, to do their Johnston Canyon Evening Icewalk.

You may have read my previous posts about doing Johnston Canyon in both Winter and Summer during the day, both were fantastic, so being able to do it at night with a guide was extra special and quite a different experience.

My colleague Layla, our friend Selena and I were collected from the town lot around 6:30 and piled into a minibus with about 12 other local girls from various hotels around Banff and Canmore. Some we had already met from other FAM tours both this year and last. Banff is a small town and you regularly run into people you have been on other excursions with which is really nice.

On the journey out to the Canyon, our guide, Denice told us about herself, the tour company and interestingly, on how unnatural light, such as mobile phones and street lights affects us humans and the wildlife around the world. It was a bit of a shock to see how nature and the human brain reacts to it. The last thing a lot of us do before bed is check our phones and this can affect sleeping, which I was aware of, but I didn’t know the reason why. Apparently this is due to phones giving off artificial blue light. Red light is a way of nature telling us that it’s time to sleep, that is why the last of the sun’s rays are red as it sets, and why doctors tell insomniacs to install a red light in their bedside lamps to fall asleep easier.

Once at the trail head, we were given Ice cleats (much easier to put on that snowshoes!)  and headlamps which we were able to keep.  We headed off into the night, past the resort and down the the Canyon. The 3 of us were eagerly chatting and catching up on each other’s adventures so were constantly behind the group, it was very icy in places and not being able to see too well made it slow going.1Heading down the icy path with our headlamps on.

Once into the Canyon proper and with the metal railing to guide us, we were able to shut off our headlamps to get the full effect of the night sky. Our guide had studied astronomy since 1995 so was well equipped to point out various constellations to us. I found it a bit baffling, it was hard to see where she was pointing at times and most of the time I wasn’t able to figure out what the constellations were, I just saw a bunch of stars, some brighter than others but no pattern. 1Walking on the steel catwalks attached to the Canyon wall.

Something to look into as I think it’s fascinating and she did mention NZ was one of the best places to see the stars as it has such low artificial light. What I did see was Meteorites shooting across the night sky, that night the Geminids meteor shower peaked and apparently as many as 120 meteors an hour could be seen. As we stood there looking up at the stars I saw a couple of bright lights shooting across the sky which I’ll never forget, I could have stared up at that sky for hours and at that point I wished I’d had a decent camera and a tripod instead of an iphone5. Still, its all in my memory.2I think the three of us wished we had better cameras….

On arrival at the lower falls we came across another tour group and stopped for Maple cookies (yum) and hot chocolates. We made our way through the small cave to get a better view of the falls but my camera made it look like a big blob.2I have better photos of this waterfall..

On the walk back we had the opportunity to turn off all of our headlamps and walk in the complete darkness which was eerie but mesmerising as well. The human eye is an amazing organ in that it so quickly adjusts to the darkness. The outlines of the trees and the rocky outcrops of the canyon edges meant we could walk along guided by only the starlight. 3It wasn’t that cold in the Canyon due to it being so sheltered, didn’t even need gloves!

As we neared the resort we turned our headlamps back on and continued over the bridge and back to the van where we handed in our cleats. The trip back to Banff was quiet apart from some us us discussing some of the silly questions we have had from some of our guests which was quite funny.

I’d give this tour a 7 out of 10. The walk is easy, not too strenuous and the ice cleats mean you shouldn’t fall over, it was very icy so you definitely need them. I think folks who have an interest in the constellations would get more out of it than I did in that sense.

Johnston Canyon is an activity anyone can do without a guide, day or night, Winter or Summer and plenty do. It is great to learn and be able to ask questions to a professional though.

More info:

Who: Discover Banff Tours

Where: Johnston Canyon, Banff National Park

What: Hotel Pick up & Drop off, Ice cleats& hiking poles, refreshments

Difficulty: 2.2km, 65m elevation gain

Duration: 2.5 hours

Price: $74 Adult / $42 Child

*1st photo is courtesy of Discover Banff Tours

 

 

Snowshoeing in Kootenay NP

In Early December I was lucky enough to be invited on a Snowshoeing FAM tour with Discover Banff Tours.

Discover Banff Tours is one of the most well-known tour operators in Banff and provide lots of exciting tours in and around Banff National Park. Starting in 1998, they specialise in small, personalised groups run by professional, local guides who have a passion for Banff and the National Park.

They are also involved in the Banff Ambassador Program, so almost every young traveller who comes to Banff to work, goes on their Discover Banff and its Wildlife tour when they first arrive as part of the programme.

We were collected from the town lot behind the Mount Royal Hotel at 9:30am and got into a full minibus that left for Kootenay along with a second bus full of local hotel workers. En route we were introduced to our guides, Anick and Nick, who gave us an overview of the tour, a brief history of the snowshoe, the fur trade in Canada and a brief explanation of the weather and geography of Kootenay National Park.

It was all very interesting, and I learnt a fair bit I will be able to pass onto our guests while selling this tour.

After arriving at the Paint Pots trail entrance, we clambered out of the busses and were instructed on how to put on the snowshoes that were delegated out to each of us. They are basically just a strong, wide, plastic base with 3 straps that hold your foot in and spikes on the bottom under your toes for grip on the snow. Quite odd once you put them on but after a few steps you get used to them.1Getting geared up at the trail head.

We took off in 2 groups and followed each other down the trail for about 20 metres then turned off into the forest where we meandered around and over fallen trees, up and down small mounds of snow and out to the clearing of the Vermillion River.  The sun was low but bright against the white fluffy snow surrounding us and it felt warm on our faces as we came out onto the clearing. There, we were given a bit more history about the Paint Pots and a chance to walk around freely in the deep snow.2 Learning about Kootenay National Park.

Crossing the large, wooden bridge was a bit of a challenge, climbing up and down stairs in snowshoes is no easy fete I can tell you! The Kootenay River that starts high up in the surrounding mountain passes, flows down to the US, back up into Canada and finally out to the Pacific Ocean was semi-frozen and where it had frozen, small multi-levelled waterfalls appeared making the flow even more interesting, especially as it glistened in the late morning sunlight. 3Glistening Keeoenay River in the morning sunlight.

After splitting into smaller groups, we ambled off into the Pine forest on the opposite side of the river where Anick stopped to explain the distinct types of Pine trees in the thicket we were walking through, after about 5 minutes walking at a fast pace we hit upon a large, flat clearing containing relics from the Ochre mining days. Old, rusted pipes and scoops litter the ground amongst the snowy mounds that in Summer are dark red Ochre mounds that were once destined for Calgary to be made into a pigment base for paint.4Ochre deposits under the snow.

We trudged up the trail towards the Paint Pots site and on the way up we found a small snow-covered hill to the right of the trail, our guides thought it would be a great idea to have a race from the top back to the trail and test out our running style in snowshoes. It was pretty funny, although most participants only managed a fast walk instead of a full-on run. 5Ready to hurtle themselves down the snowbank.

Once at the Paint Pots we had a look around and learnt more about the Ochre and how they collected it for. I think this site is better visited in the Summer, so you can actually see the colours of the different pools as well as the red Ochre on the ground, in the Winter, it’s all covered in snow, so you cannot appreciate how different this spot is to the rest of the park. It’s still beautiful all the same.

We wandered out of the clearing and back into the woods again, this time heading up above the pots on a trail through the tall Pine forest. We stopped briefly to observe a large tree favourited by passing Bears who had been scratching at it. There were huge claw marks all over it, the highest one being about a foot taller than me. Standing there I was glad it was Winter and the Bears in the area had already gone off to hibernate…hopefully.

We met up with the remainder of the group for a well-earned rest in a sloped clearing covered in deep snow. Our guides set up their small camping stoves to heat up the Maple Taffy and handed out hot chocolates to keep our hands warm as we waited in anticipation for out sweet treats. Maple Taffy is made by boiling Maple SAP to 112 degrees and then pouring it onto the cold snow where it sets. A popsicle stick is then rested on the Taffy as it sets then rolled around the stick to create a Maple lolly-pop.

This traditional dessert’s origins lie in Quebec, Eastern Ontario, New Brunswick, Manitoba and New England. 7Making traditional Maple Taffy.

While most of the group rested and indulged in hot drinks and Taffy, some tried the ‘crazy carpets’. Basically, pieces of thick plastic you ride down the slope on, head first! People would go to the top, lie on the crazy carpet and zoom down the hill at high speeds, either crashing into the snowbanks in a burst of powder or making it all the way to the end and stopping softly as the slope flattened out.

After packing up all the gear and putting our snowshoes back on the whole group made their way back into the forest to head back to the trail head. This was probably the most technical park of the hike, as we were climbing over fallen trees, crossing small semi frozen creeks and negotiating sticks and branches that were blocking the trail. A few people stumbled as the backs of their shoes got stuck between tree branches, this included me, and I understood why snowshoeing burns 400 calories per hour after this short jaunt through the woods.8Negotiating fallen trees, creeks and snowbanks in the woods.

We made our way easily through the clearing and over the bridge, again, with great difficulty, and meandered, in small groups, back to the vans where we parted ways with our shoes and jumped in for the 45-minute journey back to Banff.9Overall, I’d give this tour a 6 out of 10. The guides were interesting, knowledgeable and friendly and made sure everyone was coping with the pace. The walk itself was both relaxing and challenging, we had a lot of different terrain to walk on which kept things interesting and the weather was excellent.  I do however prefer this particular walk in the Summer due to the Paint Pots being a place where the colours of the ponds and the ground is the main attraction. In winter all that is covered in snow, so you cannot appreciate it.

More info:

Who: Discover Banff Tours

Where: Kootenay National Park

What: Hotel Pick up & Drop off, Snowshoes & hiking poles, refreshments, crazy carpet ride

Difficulty: 3km, minimal elevation gain

Duration: 4 hours

Cost: $74 Adults / $42 Children

Winter has arrived…..

This Winter has arrived quite suddenly. Banff pretty much went from Fall sunshine to snowy Winter skies in a week. 

The temperature has plummeted down to -15 and the town has a carpet of white that should last the next 6 months. 

The first ski hill has opened and the other two are due to open next week.

It’s beautiful. 

Bow River starting to freeze over, soon people will be walking over it.

Mount Rundle

Cascade Mountain towering over the town.

Hike to the ‘Lakes in the Clouds’

Winter is nearly here and a lot of the Summer activities are closing for the season. Sunday was the last day the Lake Agnes Tea House was open so my colleague Layla and I went for a hike up there in the morning. Layla is British so loves a cuppa. Funnily enough she grew up in Basingstoke, just over the hill from Newbury where I lived for many years, it’s a small world indeed!

We left my house around 8am and drive up to Lake Louise and managed to park in the first parking lot due to it being so early in the day. Even the lakeshore wasn’t that crowded which made a pleasant change.The trail starts just past the Chateau and quickly rises steeply up through the forest zigzagging all the way up to Mirror Lake. The path is well worn and wide and mainly consists of dirt at the beginning but gets a lot rockier as you ascend upwards towards the treeline.  
There is not a lot to see most of the journey up, the forest is beautiful and sheltered from the weather and you do get the odd glimpse of the bright blue lake in places and views of the surrounding mountain ranges and the Big Beehive.Once we got 2/3 of the way up we came across Mirror Lake, a small frozen lake at the foot of the Big Beehive. It’s a pretty spot for a rest and a sit down before you head up the steepest bit of trail up to the Teahouse and Lake Agnes. Up here the trees thin out and you start to get views over the valley to the Lake Louise ski resort and down the Bow Valley towards Banff. It’s impressive and a nice reward for the hard slog up.After 15 minutes or so you turn a corner and come across a small waterfall and a flight of stairs. Sitting atop these stairs is the Lake Agnes Teahouse. The building is a small log cabin with a large, covered verandah that houses the kitchen and tearooms on the lower level and the staff accommodation in the loft. Staff stay there over the Summer and hike up with fresh supplies 2-3 times a week, they also do 20-30 trips by helicopter at the start of the Summer to bring up the majority of the supplies. All the garbage is carried down by staff and guests who wish to help. (We carried down a bag of rubbish)It’s a quirky little place, we sat inside and had a pot of tea and a Mars bar while we chatted to a young couple from California who had hiked up with their 2-month-old baby, and what a happy wee thing he was, all rugged up and smiley.

We walked past the Teahouse along the lake for a better view of the surrounding mountains, Mt Whyte, Mt Niblock and Devil’s Thumb. The trail continues from Lake Agnes up to the Big Beehive and I would have loved to go up there but Layla had to work at 3 so we didn’t have enough time. You can also hike a further hour on to the Plain of Six Glaciers Tea House which looks amazing too.The way back down probably took us longer than it did to get up as the weather turned while we were up there and it was snowing quite heavily on our decent. The path had become extremely icy due to footfall and snow so we were slipping and sliding all over the place. Layla was first to slip over in a style that can only be described as cartoon like, she was on her back in a flash as both feet went out from under her, it looked very sore.  In one particular spot we were joined by a guide from the Chateau and 2 of his guests who had ice cleats on so they offered a steady arm for each of us to grip onto to prevent us sliding down the path. There were a lot of other hikers slipping over and the guide was warning people about the hazards. Apparently, a woman had been airlifted to hospital after slipping over on the trail the day before! They helped us down until the path became less icy and we chatted quite a bit. They were lovely, very helpful people.Once down on Lake level we walked around the end of Lake Louise, past the Chateau and the 1000s of visitors that had now descended on the place and back to the carpark. A great day with more than a few laughs along the way.

• Time: half-day hike (1-2hrs one way)

• Distance: 7 km (4.5 miles) return or 3.5 km from Lake Louise

• Elevation Gain: 400 m (1300 ft)

• Altitude: 2135 m (7005 ft)