It’s looking like a great season so far!

It’s been a brilliant start to the ski season, rumour has it ‘it’s the best since sometime in the 50’s’ but I have also been told they say that every year.

I’ve skied 15 days so far and am well on my way to beating last year’s total of 50 days on the hill.

Sunshine Village has had a heap of powder days already this season and although it’s challenging for me to ski in powder, I have been getting a lot of practice in and am starting to enjoy floating through the champagne snow which is a foot deep in places. At least if I do fall over, it’s not painful, its just hard work to dig yourself out. I can see why snowboarders love it! Powder day at Sunshine

The weather hasn’t been great in terms of sunshine. Up until this week there has been a lot of ‘white-outs’, snowy days and visibility has been very poor. But, this week the sun came out and is staying out for the next few days. Skiing on a ‘bluebird’ day is just amazing! The snow glistens, the views are amazing, and you can see exactly where you are going. There really is nothing like it.Powder day at Sunshine=happy girls!

Lake Louise hosted the FIS World cup early in the season and the crews who got it all ready did a fantastic job. The hours of snowmaking and putting in fences took an army and the event was a tremendous success, even on the day where a fallen tree caused the power to go out in the resort, so the athletes had to be taken up to the starting gates by other means, snowplough, helicopter and snowmobile I believe.Layla, Selina and I at the World Cup

Skiing in the early part of November was different, the snow in places was quite space and my skis took a bit of a beating due to rocks that were not quite covered. I actually don’t mind this too much as it makes you a more technical skier and able to manage difficult terrain to find the best snow. One day we even came across a sign advising us to ‘take off your skis/board and walk around this corner’, sod that! I went straight over the rocks, no problem!

Now the resort has had a fair bit more snow the conditions are fantastic, I like to spend most of my time over the back bowls and on Larch where the runs are long and less busy that on the frontside.

Even though Norquay is a lot smaller I have been up twice this season and really enjoyed it. The views over Banff from Cascade chair are just stunning. Its so exhilarating seeing the mighty Mount Rundle in the distance as you climb the hill and whizz back down.

Mount Rundle seen from Mt Norquay

Spirit chair opened this week, and it was great to be able to explore the runs around there. Their runs are quite a bit steeper compared to other ski hills so more of a challenge. I look forward to exploring Norquay more and their French fries are the best in Banff so its always a nice reward after a few hard runs.Selina and I at Norquay

Watch this space for more exciting tales of powder, bluebird days and mountain fun!

Advertisements

50 Things to do in Banff National Park

Banff National Park is Canada’s oldest Park and was established in 1885. It consists of 6.641 square kilometres of craggy mountain peaks, glacial lakes, Icefields, glaciers and small alpine villages visited by over 3 million visitors annually.

With this much park to explore, there are so many reasons to visit this paradise in the Rocky Mountains.

50 Things to do in Banff National Park

1. Skiing the Big 3, Sunshine Village,

Lake Louise and Mount Norquay

2. Hiking an hour to the summit of Tunnel Mountain for amazing views of Banff and the Bow Valley

3. Indulging in Fondue at the eclectic Grizzly House restaurant

4. Exploring the Fairmont Banff Springs Hotel grounds and having a stein at The Waldhaus Pub

5. Taking the Banff Gondola to the top of Sulphur Mountain and walking to the old weather station

6. Having a soak in the 40-degree waters and enjoying the views at the Banff Upper Hot Springs

7. Strolling around Cascade Gardens looking at flowers, waterfalls and the Parks Canada building

8. Exploring the Cave and Basin historical sight and learning about the history of the National Park

9. Eating chicken wings on wing night at Mel’s bar. ($2 for 6 wings and cheap beer)

10. Taking a quick walk up to Surprise Corner for the wonderful views of the Banff Springs Hotel

11. Seeing an adventure film at the annual Banff Mountain Film & Book Festival in the Fall

12. Visiting the Parks museum, Buffalo Nation Luxton museum and Whyte museum in Banff town

13. Watching the waters of the Bow River cascade over Bow falls

14. Walking along Bow River Trail from Buffalo St to the Canoe docks trying to spot Elk

15. Eating traditional Poutine at Eddie Burger

16. Going down to Vermillion Lakes to catch the sunrise over Mount Rundle and the lakes

17. Chowing down on a Mac & Cheese pizza at High Rollers and getting in some pool and bowling

18. Ice skating on the free outdoor rink at the Banff Community High School

19. Driving out to Lake Minnewanka to see the Northern Lights dancing behind the mountains

20. Walking around the old mining town of Bankhead and admiring the views of Cascade Mountain

21. Picnicking at Cascade Ponds or Two Jack Lake and taking the kayak or paddleboard out

22. Driving around the Fairmont Golf Course loop trying to spot Elk and Black Bears

23. Heading to Earls for happy hour (3-6 & 6-close) and ordering their amazing $7 dry ribs

24. Hiking the Fenlands trail and watching the birds and animals

25. Getting your photo taken with the new BANFF sign on Lynx Street

26. Driving up to the Norquay Lookout on the ski hill access road for a magnificent view of Banff

27. Learning to Curl and catching a local ice hokey game at the Fenlands Recreation Centre

28. Hiking Johnston Canyon to see the amazing waterfalls and cascading Johnston Creek

29. Driving the Bow Valley Parkway all the way to Lake Louise and spotting wildlife

30. Hiking Sunshine Meadows up at Sunshine Village ski area and seeing the larch trees in Fall

31. Visiting the famous Lake Louise and hiring a Canoe and paddling across the lake to the glacier

32. Hiking up to the Lake Agnes teahouse and continuing to the Plain of Six Glaciers Teahouse

33. Cycling or Cross-Country skiing to the incredible Moraine Lake and the Valley of the 10 Peaks

34. Taking the short hike to the Peyto Lake lookout

35. Stopping at Castle Mountain Lookout for stunning views of this incredibly shaped mountain

36. Having an Ale brewed in Banff and watching a game of ice hockey at the Banff Ave Brewing Co

37. Taking a horse drawn sleigh ride in Banff town or along the shoreline at Lake Louise

38. X-country ski or hike the 11km to Skoki Lodge in the backcounty beyond Lake Louise Ski Resort

39. Rocket down the hill on a snowtube at Mount Norquay or Lake Louise ski areas

40. Rent a bike and cycle along the bow river to Sundance Canyon

41. Enjoy a stroll on horseback to the remote Sundance Lodge

42. Try a Beavertail at one of Banff’s two store locations

43. Enjoy a jug of beer and Thursday Night Bingo at the Banff Legion

44. Visit one on the many Galleries in town with art and craft from local artists

45. Try a relaxing float trip down the Bow river in Summer

46. Climb the hair rising Via Ferrata up above Mount Norquay’s ski runs

47. Climb the switch back trail up Sulphur Mountain and get the Gondola back down

48. Ride the mechanical Bull and do some line dancing at Wild Bill’s Saloon

49. Enjoy Banff’s Parade of Lights at Christmas and visit the Christmas markets at Warner Stables

50. See the New Years Eve fireworks while partying on Banff Avenue.

The Ski Hills are OPEN!

May 22nd, 6 months, since the last Banff based ski hill closed for the 2016/17 season. That doesn’t sound very long to someone who comes for a ski holiday once a year, but to those of us who live and work in Banff over the Winter and ski 3-4 times a week, when the season is over it feels like an eternity to wait for the next Winter.

It’s always a fun but expensive time leading up to the ski season. Firstly, you need to purchase your season’s pass and can either choose to go for just 1 mountain at around $1000 or go for The Big 3 pass which is a staggering $1600. Suffice to say it’s a quiet time of year in town for the bars and restaurants as everyone is broke for a few weeks after purchasing their passes.

Any newcomers doing the season ahead also need to get all the gear which can be very expensive, but we are lucky enough to have the Banff, Canmore and Calgary ski swaps where you can buy second hand gear for a lot less. Once you are all kitted up and have your pass, doing a whole season can be relatively cheap per day as compared to coming for a week’s holiday.

This year Mount Norquay opened on Saturday the 4th of November, the first ski hill in Canada to open its gates to the public. I went up for a few runs on the Sunday, but they only had one of their shorter lifts open, so we didn’t stay for long. Lake Louise opened on the 7th and Sunshine Village on the 8th.

FullSizeRender (010)The sun coming through the clouds above Strawberry Express

On the 8th on November I was awake at 5:30am, like a child at Christmas, I was so excited for Sunshine’s opening day and lay awake until my alarm went off at 7:30.

Normally I get the free ski shuttle from the Fairmont Hotel but on that morning, I got a lift with my flatmate and his friends. I think everyone from Banff who had the day off or was starting work later was heading up to Sunshine Village.

After a 20-minute gondola ride I was back in the surrounds of Standish, Lookout and Goat’s Eye Mountains. It felt like I’d never left and many of the people I spoke to on the various chairlifts I rode that morning said the same.

FullSizeRender (00F)Looking out over Sunshine Village and Wawa chair.

I started my day doing a few runs on Strawberry Express which is Sunshine’s beginner chair. It has a few greens and gentle blues to get your ski legs back after a long time away from the slopes. From the top of the chairlift you get an amazing view over towards Sunshine Meadows and the peaks surrounding Mount Assiniboine as well as Lookout Mountain where Angel, Teepee Town LX and the Divide chairs rise up into the clouds.

Moving on to Wawa, a more intermediate chair with long, wide blue runs and a few technical blacks I felt like I truly got my technique back as I powered down the hill executing short sharp turns over the beautifully groomed runs. I did about 7 runs off Wawa in the bright sunshine before heading down the mountain to the lower chairs.

Jackrabbit and Wolverine chairs are on the lower part of Goat’s Eye Mountain and have a variety of runs off them. I did a few of my favourite short black runs off Jackrabbit before cruising down the blues and blacks off Wolverine.

The crunching sounds of the snow being pushed aside by my skis, the whoosh of the chilly air on my face and the almost bluebird day was just what I was hoping for and Sunshine always delivers.

FullSizeRender (00D)Jackrabbit chair and one of my favorite Black Runs.

By midday I was really starting to feel the burn so returned to the Gondola mid station and headed home.

Sunshine Village, like Coronet Peak in my native New Zealand has a special place in my heart. I have skied 14 different resorts in Canada, New Zealand, France, Switzerland and Bulgaria but Sunshine has the best snow of them all.

I know the mountain so well and spent so much time there last season. It’s a mountain with something for everyone and the staff are always so happy and friendly. My boyfriend learnt to ski there and one of my best friends even got married there.

I wonder what exciting things will happen at Banff Sunshine Village this ski season.

Winter has arrived…..

This Winter has arrived quite suddenly. Banff pretty much went from Fall sunshine to snowy Winter skies in a week. 

The temperature has plummeted down to -15 and the town has a carpet of white that should last the next 6 months. 

The first ski hill has opened and the other two are due to open next week.

It’s beautiful. 

Bow River starting to freeze over, soon people will be walking over it.

Mount Rundle

Cascade Mountain towering over the town.

A Sensational Sunrise

This morning I was up bright & early and after my colleague Layla picked me up we headed down to Vermillion Lakes, just outside Banff to watch the sunrise. 

As we pulled up beside the first lake, the sky above Banff turned bright pink and purple. An incredible sight with the calm icy water of the lake in the foreground and the magnificent Mount Rundle in the background. A few minutes later orange and yellow were added to the hue and the scene changed dramatically. We moved around the lakeshore to get a few different shots of the amazing landscape it was simply breathtaking.We really do live in Paradise. 

Kings of Leon in Calgary

Last weekend a very excited Layla and I headed up to the city to see Kings of Leon at the Scotiabank SaddledomeI had seen them many years before at the O2 in London but was really keen to see them again as I love their latest albums Mechanical Bull and Walls. It was Layla’s first time seeing them and she was super excited as they were on her bucket list of bands to see!

We left in Fergus’s car around 4pm and picked up Selena from Germany, a rideshare, from up on Tunnel Mountain. Chatted and listened to KOL on the 1.5 hour drive through the mountains and plains and into the city to the HI Calgary City Centre Hostal where we all had stayed a few times before. HI Calgary is a great hostal in the East Village. It’s only a few blocks from the City Centre, the River and the Saddledome so makes a perfect place to stay when attending concerts or hockey. We paid $45 for a female 6 bed dorm with free wi-if and breakfast. 

After a quick drink at Cowboy’s Casino we headed off down to the stadium. Got our tickets at the box office before saying bye to Selena. She was in seating and we were in the pit, we befriended her on Facebook and promised to meet up in Banff. 

Got some ciders and headed down to the front of the stage. At first it wasn’t all that busy as most people were milling around in the back getting food and drinks. The support band, The Dawes, an LA based Folk Rock band were late to start so by then we had made some friends in the crowd, Ashley & Ian from Calgary, Ashley was from Calgary and had 2 children and Ian was originally from the UK.  We had also made a few bar and toilet runs before Kings of Leon appeared. Caleb told us the reason for them being late was due to their flight from Edmonton being cancelled so they had to drive down to Calgary. Fair play.They started off at a slower pace with Conversation Piece from Walls, Taper Jean Girl and The Bucket from Aha Shake Heartbreak, a song about them returning from a tour in the UK where they were huge to the US where there were still relatively unknown.  They then hit us with Eyes on You from Walls, a bouncy, upbeat tune that got the crowd moving. Next up came 2 songs off my favourite album of theirs, Only By The Night, released in 2009. Revelry and Notion. Caleb’s voice is stunning, it’s so raw and sounds exactly as it does on the recordings. Next came Fans from Because Of the Times and the huge anthem Use Somebody, a song Caleb wrote while recovering from a shoulder injury and realising he was dependant on those around him.The mood went a bit quieter after the rousing excitement of Use Somebody, the lights went down and Caleb appeared on the stage on his own for some slower songs, Milk, Talihina Sky and Walls. This band is just as talented writing slower songs as they are writing big rock anthems. Closer is one of mine and Layla’s all time favourite songs but unfortunately it wasn’t included on the nights set list. Find Me, another song from Walls I like was up next and got the stadium on it’s feet again for Crawl and Radioactive, The Immortals from Come Around Sundown and On Call, all fantastic songs I knew almost to the point I could remember all the lyrics. Around The World, a song I can relate to, was up next and by then we had met a bunch of others in the crowd from Golden and Edmonton and were all dancing and singing 3 rows back from the stage. It was unbelievable how close we were. Following Around the World they finally played a song from Mechanical Bull, an album that reminds me of travelling on the Tube when I first moved to London. Family Tree was followed by Reverend, a gritty song from Walls that was released as a promotional single for the album. Back Down South then followed Pyro, a song written about the Ruby Ridge shoot out.Next was Knocked Up, an upbeat tune about an illicit relationship ending in pregnancy, followed by No Money and finally the big ones we had all been waiting for.  Supersoaker, the lead single from Mechanical Bull is a punchy fun tune that sounds similar to the bands older stuff. It’s a great song to dance to and by then I had pealed some layers of and was loving the sweaty unruliness of the pit. My feet were stuck to the floor, cups, paper and god knows what else was being trampled on and the crowd was pumped, hands were in the air, hair was being thrown about and we were all moving as one. Next up was Sex On Fire, the bands most well know, if not overplayed song from Only By The Night. Everyone went wild and jumped up and down to the mesmerising guitar rifts and the chorus we all knew. They finished the night off with Waste A Minute from Walls, a feel good upbeat song with a message.

It was a brilliant night, when the acoustics in a venue are on par with the musisions and they sound like they do on their recordings you can’t be dissappointed. I knew 90% of the songs and the atmosphere was great. The crowd was friendly and we met a load of cool people. The setlist was really great too, old and new, fast and slow, all in a good order. 

I’ll definitely go and see them again someday, somewhere Around The World.

Hike to the ‘Lakes in the Clouds’

Winter is nearly here and a lot of the Summer activities are closing for the season. Sunday was the last day the Lake Agnes Tea House was open so my colleague Layla and I went for a hike up there in the morning. Layla is British so loves a cuppa. Funnily enough she grew up in Basingstoke, just over the hill from Newbury where I lived for many years, it’s a small world indeed!

We left my house around 8am and drive up to Lake Louise and managed to park in the first parking lot due to it being so early in the day. Even the lakeshore wasn’t that crowded which made a pleasant change.The trail starts just past the Chateau and quickly rises steeply up through the forest zigzagging all the way up to Mirror Lake. The path is well worn and wide and mainly consists of dirt at the beginning but gets a lot rockier as you ascend upwards towards the treeline.  
There is not a lot to see most of the journey up, the forest is beautiful and sheltered from the weather and you do get the odd glimpse of the bright blue lake in places and views of the surrounding mountain ranges and the Big Beehive.Once we got 2/3 of the way up we came across Mirror Lake, a small frozen lake at the foot of the Big Beehive. It’s a pretty spot for a rest and a sit down before you head up the steepest bit of trail up to the Teahouse and Lake Agnes. Up here the trees thin out and you start to get views over the valley to the Lake Louise ski resort and down the Bow Valley towards Banff. It’s impressive and a nice reward for the hard slog up.After 15 minutes or so you turn a corner and come across a small waterfall and a flight of stairs. Sitting atop these stairs is the Lake Agnes Teahouse. The building is a small log cabin with a large, covered verandah that houses the kitchen and tearooms on the lower level and the staff accommodation in the loft. Staff stay there over the Summer and hike up with fresh supplies 2-3 times a week, they also do 20-30 trips by helicopter at the start of the Summer to bring up the majority of the supplies. All the garbage is carried down by staff and guests who wish to help. (We carried down a bag of rubbish)It’s a quirky little place, we sat inside and had a pot of tea and a Mars bar while we chatted to a young couple from California who had hiked up with their 2-month-old baby, and what a happy wee thing he was, all rugged up and smiley.

We walked past the Teahouse along the lake for a better view of the surrounding mountains, Mt Whyte, Mt Niblock and Devil’s Thumb. The trail continues from Lake Agnes up to the Big Beehive and I would have loved to go up there but Layla had to work at 3 so we didn’t have enough time. You can also hike a further hour on to the Plain of Six Glaciers Tea House which looks amazing too.The way back down probably took us longer than it did to get up as the weather turned while we were up there and it was snowing quite heavily on our decent. The path had become extremely icy due to footfall and snow so we were slipping and sliding all over the place. Layla was first to slip over in a style that can only be described as cartoon like, she was on her back in a flash as both feet went out from under her, it looked very sore.  In one particular spot we were joined by a guide from the Chateau and 2 of his guests who had ice cleats on so they offered a steady arm for each of us to grip onto to prevent us sliding down the path. There were a lot of other hikers slipping over and the guide was warning people about the hazards. Apparently, a woman had been airlifted to hospital after slipping over on the trail the day before! They helped us down until the path became less icy and we chatted quite a bit. They were lovely, very helpful people.Once down on Lake level we walked around the end of Lake Louise, past the Chateau and the 1000s of visitors that had now descended on the place and back to the carpark. A great day with more than a few laughs along the way.

• Time: half-day hike (1-2hrs one way)

• Distance: 7 km (4.5 miles) return or 3.5 km from Lake Louise

• Elevation Gain: 400 m (1300 ft)

• Altitude: 2135 m (7005 ft)

 

 

World Tourism Day 2017

Today is World Tourism Day and I have thousands of photos of my travels throughout the 26 countries I’ve visited but can’t pick a favourite or one that represents all travel. So here is a picture of the view from my Mum’s house in Dunedin, NZ. It’s home. The place I seem to spend the least time but think about the most. This was taken in 2011 when I was last home. 

Travelling is the best thing I have ever done and the experiences I’ve had are unforgettable and the people I’ve met incredible, there is a downside though and that is missing my family. 

I only see them once every few years which is sad but I speak to them regularly which is good. Thanks to things like Skype and Facebook they don’t seem as far away.

Sunshine Meadows – Fall Hiking

The first time I visited a ski resort in summer was when I was about 13 and my Mum, my cousin and I went up to Coronet Peak in Queenstown, NZ for a walk. It was hot and dry and I wore a vest top and a mini skirt. (Hey, it was the 90s!) I remember the main building being open but apart from hiking there wasn’t much more to do apart from enjoy the views over Lake Wakatipu and The Remarkables.The next time was Whistler Blackcomb in 2016. This time the mountain was geared up for the Summer with mountain biking trails, hiking, the Peak to Peak gondola, lots of restaurants and bars and concerts going on all the time. I admit Whistler is a much bigger resort but I think ski resorts these days offer much more in the way of Summer activities.This week Fergus, our flatmate Kurt and I visited Sunshine Meadows. After skiing all season at Sunshine Village, I didn’t want to miss the opportunity to visit the ski area in the off season. It was the beginning of Fall when we visited so there was plenty of snow covering the ground but the trails were mainly snow free and we were able to enjoy the Autumn colours and warmth on the last open day of the hiking season.

Upon arrival, we bought our discounted tickets (due to having a season pass last ski season) for the shuttle bus and Standish chair from guest services. We got on the old yellow school bus along with a swarm of tourists and started up the ski out to the main village.

Travelling up the ski out in a bus made it look a lot steeper than it looks and feels when skiing down it at high speeds after a long day on the slopes. It was also a lot bumpier and at some points I was concerned the old bus would burst a tyre or stop altogether and slide back down the mountain. It was an enjoyable ride despite this and it was great to be up high and look down onto the Black Middle and Lower Canyon runs and of course see the waterfalls and mountain streams, without snow cover.

We hopped on Standish chair which felt a bit odd without skis strapped to our feet but it was great to be heading up the familiar slope again, seeing the ski area to the left of us and the mountain ranges in front of us stretching out as far as the eye could see. It was a tad chilly going up but once at the top the wind died down as we headed out towards the Standish Viewing Deck. This is a large wooden deck situated on the ridge about 400 metres from the top of the Standish chair, the view from the deck is just incredible. You lookout over the whole of Sunshine Meadows, including Rock Isle, Laryx and Grizzly lakes, Simpson River Valley, various mountain ranges and peaks including the impressive Monarch and famous Mount Assiniboine. To the left, the Angel and Divide chairs rise up Lookout mountain with their empty chairs dangling, waiting for the Winter crowds. Its just breathtaking.We quickly started to descend the steep and slippery trail down to Twin Cairns Junction to avoid the crowds, most tourists are not used to walking in snow and we were just as bad, Fergus and Kurt wore Vans, not so good in the snow, I had my North Face Hiking boots on but still managed to slip over onto my knees at one point but that’s just incoordination on my part I think. The view over the Valleys below The Monarch were very autumnal indeed, the oranges and yellows of the Larch trees and the dark green of the evergreens contrasted with the bright white snow covering the ground.We arrived at Rock Isle Junction and carried onto the Grizzly/Laryx Loop trail. En route we passed the beautiful Rock Isle Lake, the most well known and largest Lake at Sunshine Meadows. The lake gets its name from the rocky island in the centre of it where a few trees call home. Behind the Lake, Lookout mountain towered above the meadows and you could clearly see the Divide chair and most of the runs coming off it. They looked much steeper from way down in the valley. Some of the mountain was covered in snow but it was patchy and hard to imaging opening day is only a month and a half away.We carried on down the hill to Grizzly Lake where we were happy to find a few hikers enjoying their lunch. We hadn’t seen anyone for a while and arriving at a lake named after the most feared animal in the Rockies we were a little relieved to see people. Grizzly lake was a different colour than Rock Isle. Rock Isle is bluer and is more out in the open whereas Grizzly is quite sheltered by steep banks and forest. On the far side and head of the lake you could see where the recent forest fires had burnt away the trees in huge areas. The Verdant Creek fire had come very close to the ski resort and during the Summer the lodge was used as a base for the firefighters who were working on fighting the huge fire.Continuing past the lake the trail rose up onto a cliff face and we came upon Simpson Viewpoint. This lookout was probable the highlight of the day for me, the huge Simpson River Valley spreads out before you far into the distance, the different shades of greens in the hills, cliffs and mountains make the valley look even deeper and I was sure I could see all the way to Radium. The most interesting yet sad feature of the valley was the amount of burnt forest there was on both sides of the valley. I’m so glad we had some snow recently so the fires were able to be put out and we were able to visit Sunshine Meadows, it was closed for hiking for a lot of the summer.We walked down the hill to Laryx Lake, the 3rd lake in the Meadows. We were able to walk almost the entire way around Laryx on the stony trail, across narrow log bridges and over the grassy plains. Laryx was quite calm and was sheltered from the wind so we were able to see the reflections of the surrounding mountain peaks in its shallow water which was beautiful. Sat down for a bit and watched a young Chipmunk scurry about looking for dropped food.After a short rest we climbed back up to Rock Isle Lake and at Rock Isle Junction we turned onto the Village to Lake Trail and headed up towards Divide Chair and the runs that come off Stawberry. After stopping at the Rock Isle viewpoint we continued down the path beside the Rock Isle Road green run back to the village. It was nice to actually walk along a ski run we had all been down many times. Being back at the Village when there was no snow was odd, we saw stairs that are usually buried under the snow and paths, roads and signposts that are not normally there, the place looked quite different. Waited for the shuttle bus for around 30 minutes before being informed it had broken down on the way up so we were driven back to the base in a small van. 

It was a great but tiring day and I’m glad I got to experience it before we leave Canada. 

 

 

Lakes, lakes and Waterfalls

This weekend we took my one of my best mates and former flatmate and his boyfriend, both over from London to some of my favourite places in Banff and Yoho National Parks. 

This post doesn’t contain ellobarate descriptions of the places we went, no detailed accounts of the colours of the lakes or the shadows over the valley from the mountains etc, the pictures speak for themselves in my opinion. 

First we did the 10 minute, short hike to the lookout point overlooking stunning Peyto Lake and the surrounding Waputik Range, Caldron Peak, Peyto Peak and Mount Jimmy Simpson. Photobombed by 2 ladies! Love this photo.Stunning Peyto Lake, amazing colour.One of the best views in the Rockies!

We then headed to the most famous lake in Banff National Park, Lake Louise. Lake Louise is beautiful but it just gets far too busy and I much prefer it in Winter when you can walk across the lake to the Glacier, and it’s far quieter.Lake Louise shorelineLouise Creek

After being turned away from the Moraine Lake turnoff and the overflow parking lot due to it being full we detoured up the Trans Canada to Yoho National Park to visit Takakkaw Falls. It was my first visit to the falls and after a very windey and steep but magnificent drive we arrived at the carpark. It’s a short 10 minute hike to the falls but we decided to scramble up to get a closer look and were awarded with a great view of the 260 metre falls, the creek below and the surrounding peaks.Takakkaw FallsAdam & Gilles Stunning views

Later in the day we finally make it to my favourite lake, Moraine Lake in the Valley of the Ten Peaks. Unfortunately we were too Lake to go Kayaking and have a bite to eat at the cafe but climbed the rock pile to get some lovely views of the lake and valleys around it. Not many places compare to this.Adam & IAdam & GillesLooking down the valley towards the highway

Overall it was of my favourite days out sightseeing. I just love taking friends to see these amazing local spots and seeing new places for myself. There is still so much to see here in the Rockies. I cannot wait!